Facebook: A very 21st Century digital finance platform

Author: Grace Durie

To like, or not to like, that is the question…

I ‘like’ a lot of things on Facebook: Paris, The England Rugby Team and Robert Downey Jr. among them. Whether a city you have lived in or a team you follow, it’s these things that people most commonly ‘like’… Or so I can gather, after a quick whip around of all my friends, to work out if it was just me who steered clear of anything too deep and meaningful on my Facebook account.

I have already delved into deepest, darkest Twitter to see my bank’s presence and came out pleasantly surprised. So I thought, after one good experience I would see what my bank had to offer on Facebook…

The experience this time round was less pleasant and also less surprising…

My bank had seven pages available on Facebook: One was what I had assumed would be the main page. A simple, colourful, easy to navigate Facebook page with a ‘Like’ button on the side of it. Perfect! Until I realised that the page was geared towards students, all very well and good, except for those of us who are no longer at university.

There was another that required me to add the bank as a ‘Friend’ a less than appealing option as your friends can send you private messages and write on your wall and although I’m intrigued by ‘Facebook banking’ I’m not convinced I to be that up close and personal with my bank.

The others looked somewhat half-finished and in my heart of hearts, I can’t quite convince myself that they’re legitimate, so I decide, on balance, not to sign myself up to them.

So I’m left facing a bit of a quandary. Without the appropriate page there seems little way to move forward in my quest for Facebook banking and after such a short space of time I am disappointed in the lack of visibility that my bank has demonstrated in a channel that has proven to be exceptionally important over the past few years.

I was hoping for something grand, a whole new way of interacting with my bank instead I left with a vague sense of something being unfinished, a resource with so much potential being underused; especially since, when searching for other banks I discovered that some had Facebook pages that are fully functioning, geared towards people like me. So they exist… there is empirical evidence of these pages, but sadly at this particular moment in time, they don’t exist for me.

I hope that my bank catches up, that I’m afforded the chance to use this new channel in all its glory, because I think my bank are missing a trick, that the number of ‘likes’ a financial institution can accumulate in this day and age is becoming crucial and after all, who doesn’t want to be liked?

12 Feb 2014

Author: Grace Durie

To like, or not to like, that is the question…

I ‘like’ a lot of things on Facebook: Paris, The England Rugby Team and Robert Downey Jr. among them. Whether a city you have lived in or a team you follow, it’s these things that people most commonly ‘like’… Or so I can gather, after a quick whip around of all my friends, to work out if it was just me who steered clear of anything too deep and meaningful on my Facebook account.

I have already delved into deepest, darkest Twitter to see my bank’s presence and came out pleasantly surprised. So I thought, after one good experience I would see what my bank had to offer on Facebook…

The experience this time round was less pleasant and also less surprising…

My bank had seven pages available on Facebook: One was what I had assumed would be the main page. A simple, colourful, easy to navigate Facebook page with a ‘Like’ button on the side of it. Perfect! Until I realised that the page was geared towards students, all very well and good, except for those of us who are no longer at university.

There was another that required me to add the bank as a ‘Friend’ a less than appealing option as your friends can send you private messages and write on your wall and although I’m intrigued by ‘Facebook banking’ I’m not convinced I to be that up close and personal with my bank.

The others looked somewhat half-finished and in my heart of hearts, I can’t quite convince myself that they’re legitimate, so I decide, on balance, not to sign myself up to them.

So I’m left facing a bit of a quandary. Without the appropriate page there seems little way to move forward in my quest for Facebook banking and after such a short space of time I am disappointed in the lack of visibility that my bank has demonstrated in a channel that has proven to be exceptionally important over the past few years.

I was hoping for something grand, a whole new way of interacting with my bank instead I left with a vague sense of something being unfinished, a resource with so much potential being underused; especially since, when searching for other banks I discovered that some had Facebook pages that are fully functioning, geared towards people like me. So they exist… there is empirical evidence of these pages, but sadly at this particular moment in time, they don’t exist for me.

I hope that my bank catches up, that I’m afforded the chance to use this new channel in all its glory, because I think my bank are missing a trick, that the number of ‘likes’ a financial institution can accumulate in this day and age is becoming crucial and after all, who doesn’t want to be liked?