Touch ID – Apple’s way of getting into your psyche?

Author: Barbara Seljak

Fingerprint id could effect digital banking apps

Rumour has it that Apple iPhone 5S with its fingerprint scanner ‘Touch ID’ is set to be the best selling phone ever. And what buzz it has received!

Is it the novelty of pressing your finger against the Home button to unlock it that gets people into a frenzy, or is it simply the Apple brand that is convincing consumers to queue for days to get their hands on one? Maybe it’s the convenience of not having to type in a password every time, or the compatibility of having your music available across multiple Apple devices? Or, quite possibly, the draw might be in the mystery surrounding the launch of each new device – the anticipation, and the build to D-Day.

Whatever the case, Apple has for many years had the combined appeal of great design, a wide range of products on offer, and quite persuasive marketing.

Maybe Apple will appeal to consumers even more now with its iPhone 5S and its Touch ID, making each device tailored to its owner with a unique identifier. You become one with your device, and the device becomes a part of you. Apple does marketing like many of us can only dream of. And, rather than what Touch ID can do now, the allure might possibly be in what it will be able to do in the future… will it really change the way we shop, interact with appliances, do banking, and, basically, run our lives?

However there are security concerns which have been expressed by many, from security researchers to journalists and even a US senator.

For many Apple fans, Friday Sept 19th marked a highly anticipated day to get their hands on a new iPhone 5S – but for hackers it started a competition for who could hack the scanner first, with a number of websites launching to start the race. There have been some issues with Touch ID that Apple have already admitted – unlocking becomes difficult if the user’s finger is greasy, wet, or possibly scarred. But one thing Apple might have improved on: it might just convince the 50% of existing iPhone users that currently do not use password-protection to set up the cool new feature and lock their phones.

Touch ID might be the latest and best in biometric solutions, an extra layer in the security blanket. Whether Apple does sell the most devices remains a question for now but, whatever their plans are for Touch ID, this electronic device already makes you feel like it is a part of your DNA.

24 Sep 2013

Author: Barbara Seljak

Fingerprint id could effect digital banking apps

Rumour has it that Apple iPhone 5S with its fingerprint scanner ‘Touch ID’ is set to be the best selling phone ever. And what buzz it has received!

Is it the novelty of pressing your finger against the Home button to unlock it that gets people into a frenzy, or is it simply the Apple brand that is convincing consumers to queue for days to get their hands on one? Maybe it’s the convenience of not having to type in a password every time, or the compatibility of having your music available across multiple Apple devices? Or, quite possibly, the draw might be in the mystery surrounding the launch of each new device – the anticipation, and the build to D-Day.

Whatever the case, Apple has for many years had the combined appeal of great design, a wide range of products on offer, and quite persuasive marketing.

Maybe Apple will appeal to consumers even more now with its iPhone 5S and its Touch ID, making each device tailored to its owner with a unique identifier. You become one with your device, and the device becomes a part of you. Apple does marketing like many of us can only dream of. And, rather than what Touch ID can do now, the allure might possibly be in what it will be able to do in the future… will it really change the way we shop, interact with appliances, do banking, and, basically, run our lives?

However there are security concerns which have been expressed by many, from security researchers to journalists and even a US senator.

For many Apple fans, Friday Sept 19th marked a highly anticipated day to get their hands on a new iPhone 5S – but for hackers it started a competition for who could hack the scanner first, with a number of websites launching to start the race. There have been some issues with Touch ID that Apple have already admitted – unlocking becomes difficult if the user’s finger is greasy, wet, or possibly scarred. But one thing Apple might have improved on: it might just convince the 50% of existing iPhone users that currently do not use password-protection to set up the cool new feature and lock their phones.

Touch ID might be the latest and best in biometric solutions, an extra layer in the security blanket. Whether Apple does sell the most devices remains a question for now but, whatever their plans are for Touch ID, this electronic device already makes you feel like it is a part of your DNA.